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Articles & Research

Articles & Research

 

Here you'll find a selection of the best current scientific and music education research to provoke and inspire you and keep you one step ahead. Carefully selected for interest and relevance and available as downloads or links. There are suggestions for further reading as well as short video presentations and journal articles.

Displaying 1 to 10 (of 10 products) Result Pages:  1 
How I can help my baby relieve their colic distress? Building Baby's Brain: The Role of Music Functional specializations for music processing in the newborn The Importance of Prenatal Sound and Music

How I can help my baby relieve their colic distress?

Building Baby's Brain: The Role of Music

Functional specializations for music processing in the newborn

The Importance of Prenatal Sound and Music

Colic (crying for 3 or more hours per day) usually starts to improve at about six weeks of age, and is generally gone by the time your baby is 12 weeks old. While you are waiting for that magic resolution, try these techniques to help soothe your infant: - Play music and dance with your baby. - Massage your baby. Find out how to do...
"Researchers believe that musical training actually creates new pathways in the brain." Music has a powerful effect on our emotions. Parents know that a quiet, gentle lullaby can soothe a fussy baby. And a majestic chorus can make us swell with excitement. But music also can affect the way we think. In recent years, we've learned...
Newborns show neural emotional responses to musical stimuli because a neuronal architecture serving the processing of music is already present at birth. “We used functional MRI to measure brain activity in 1- to 3-day-old newborns while they heard excerpts of Western tonal music and altered versions of the same excerpts. Altered ve...
“The foetus is having its first language lessons in the womb. The inflections of the mother tongue are conveyed not only through speech but most importantly through song. The singing voice has a richer frequency range than speech. In fact, studies in other disciplines such as linguistics and musicology (e.g., David Whitwell, 1993) point ou...
Newborn babies start learning language in the womb Sing and observe... sing and cuddle... sing and sing Listening to nursery rhymes Communicative Musicality: Exploring the basis of companionship

Newborn babies start learning language in the womb

Sing and observe... sing and cuddle... sing and sing

Listening to nursery rhymes

Communicative Musicality: Exploring the basis of companionship

The melodies of the newborn babies' cries followed the same intonations of the languages the babies had heard in the womb. Read the article here...
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Listening to nursery rhymes helps children to build expectations and manage when they fail in terms of what, in terms of where, in terms of when and when not.</p> <p>October 21, 2011 - Professor Jonathan Berger continues the discussion on brain research at Stanford and pushes the topic in a different direction by looking at how music...
Communicative Musicality explores the intrinsic musical nature of human interaction. The theory of communicative musicality was developed from groundbreaking studies showing how in mother/infant communication there exist noticeable patterns of timing, pulse, voice timbre, and gesture. Without intending to, the exchange between a mother and her i...
Resisting Pressure to Create Brainier Babies Babies' Brains Need Music

Resisting Pressure to Create Brainier Babies

Babies' Brains Need Music

"The biggest problem with using videos, CDs and preprogrammed electronic toys to stimulate your baby is that it keeps her away from essential learning and interaction, and it emphasizes the wrong things" says Patricia Kuhl, Ph.D., professor of Speech and Hearing Sciences and co-director of the Institute for Learning and Brain Sciences at the Uni...
According to researchers at McMaster University in Canada - very early music training can benefit children - before they even learn to walk or talk. The researchers found that one-year-old babies who participated in interactive music classes with their parents smiled more - communicated better and showed earlier and more sophisticated brain reac...
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